Sunday, January 13, 2008

Ovulation Test Kits

If you and your partner are trying to conceive an ovulation test kit is a great tool. It can help you by finding out when your body releases an egg from your ovary, an ovulation, and pin point the time of the month when you are most fertile. The egg, once released from the ovary, only has a 24-48 hour life span, while sperm can survive for about 72 hours. You are most likely to become pregnant when sperm is present on the day prior to, the day of, or the day following ovulation.

Ovulation test kits measure the amount of luteinizing hormone (LH) in your urine. Luteinizing hormone is always present in human urine. LH increases dramatically just before a woman’s most fertile day of the month in a process commonly referred to as the “LH Surge”. This LH increase triggers ovulation, which means an egg is released from the woman’s ovary. It is important to know that some infertility treatment medications, such as menotropin, may affect the test result. Certain rare medical conditions or the onset of menopause can cause elevated levels of LH. Some women do not ovulate every cycle, and therefore will not see any increase in the level of LH hormone during these non-ovulating cycles. Women with Poly Cystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) may not get reliable results from ovulation tests, as a result of related hormone imbalances. Please check with your doctor if you are unsure.

To find out when to begin testing, determine the length of your normal cycle. The length of your cycle is from the beginning of one period (the first day of bleeding) to the day before the start of the next. If your cycle length is irregular (varies by more than a few days each month) take the average number of days for the last 3 months. Ovulation typically occurs in the middle of your cycle. It is recommended to begin testing a few days before ovulation occurs. For example, if your period normally begins every 28 days then ovulation would occur on or around day 14 of your cycle. In this case, you would want to begin ovulation testing eleven days after the beginning of your last period. Most test kits come with a sample calendar to help you determine which day in your cycle to begin testing.

Read all the instructions that come with the test kit fully before starting your test. The best times to test are from 11am to 3pm and 5pm to 10pm. Early morning testing is not recommended as most women experience a blood LH surge that will not show up in the urine until later in the day. To make sure you catch your LH surge, test twice a day, once in the earlier time frame and the other in the later time frame. Reduce your liquid intake two hours before testing since drinking excessive amounts of fluids can dilute the LH in your urine yielding a false negative result. Test at the same time each day. Have intercourse during the 48 hours following your LH surge to maximize your chances of conception.



About the Author: Eric Daiter has been sponsored by The NJ Center for Fertility and Reproductive Medicine, LLC, a leading provider of infertility treatment, to explain what an ovulation test is in plain language. To review this information, please visit www.infertilitytutorials.com.

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Infertility Treatment Articles: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is a medical condition characterized by high levels of androgen hormones, missed or irregular periods, and multiple cysts on the ovaries. Researchers estimate 1 in 10 women have PCOS, although many are unaware they have it. Because of the confusing nature of the disease and the extensive list of symptoms, coping with PCOS poses a significant emotional and physical challenge.

While researchers have been aware of polycystic ovary syndrome for over 75 years, the exact causes are unknown. Some scientists suspect genes to be the cause. Often women who have PCOS will also have a sister or mother with the disease. Another theory is based around insulin. Women whose bodies have difficulty utilizing insulin end up with higher than normal levels of insulin in their system. Excess insulin increases the production of androgens, male hormones, which may lead to acne, facial hair growth, weight problems, and cysts on the ovaries. Other symptoms may include male pattern baldness, oily skin or dandruff, high blood pressure and cholesterol, infertility, chronic pelvic pain, and sleep apnea. Many women also experience bouts of depression related to their appearance or inability to conceive.

PCOS is one of the most common causes of female infertility. Clinical studies show approximately 70% of infertile women with an ovulation problem have PCOS. High levels of insulin stimulate the ovaries to produce testosterone. This excess testosterone can prevent the ovaries from releasing an egg, resulting in irregular menstrual cycle. Irregular and missed cycles reduce the chances of conception. Once pregnancy is achieved, it can cause complications during pregnancy which may lead to miscarriage or premature delivery. Incidence of miscarriage may be as high as 50%, or 35% higher than the national average. The theory is that high insulin levels result in an irregular blood clotting around the uterine lining which compromises the flow of nutrients and release of wastes between the placenta and the fetus.

Unfortunately there is no cure of the disease; however the symptoms are largely treatable by adjustments in lifestyle and medications. Some medications used during infertility treatment, such as metformin, can help normalize insulin levels and reduce the symptoms experienced. Losing weight may also help reduce symptoms. Oral contraceptive pills, such as can be taken to help regulate periods and cut down on the unwanted hair growth. Treatment plans must be customized, as each woman will experience varying levels of the symptoms.

Researchers are seeking women ages 12 and up to join in studies related to Polycystic Ovary Syndrome all across America. More information about these studies, ranging from genetics, to diabetes, to reproduction, can be found online at www.clinicaltrials.gov.


About the Author: Eric Daiter has been sponsored by The NJ Center for Reproductive Medicine, a leading provider of infertility treatment, to write information about chronic pelvic pain. For more information, please visit www.infertilitytutorials.com



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